Managers

Emily Floyd

Emily Floyd is the manager for the Global Neuroethics Summit, as well as the program coordinator for the Emory Integrity Project at the Center for Ethics at Emory University. Emily primarily focuses on program development and implementation and looks forward to seeing the 2018 GNS come to life in Seoul, South Korea.

Celeste Fong

Celeste Fong

Celeste Fong is the assistant manager for the Global Neuroethics Summit. She is currently pursuing a master’s degree in Bioethics with a certificate in Neuroethics at Emory University. Her primary interests include the relationships between the neurobiology of mental disorders and moral value in decision-making. Previously, Celeste completed undergraduate degrees in Neuroscience and Philosophy at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. She is very much looking forward to meeting everyone and participating in the 2018 GNS in Seoul, S. Korea this Fall.

Hyunjung Kim

Hyunjung Kim

Hyunjung is the assistant manager for the Global Neuroethics Summit and works at the Brain Research Policy Center of the Korea Brain Research Institute(KBRI). She completed her master’s certificate program in political science at the Graduate School of Sogang University; International Relations is her specialty.

Prior to joining the KBRI in 2016, she has worked in the Department of Climate Change Action at the Korea Environment Corporation(Keco) and participated in 2014 United Nations Climate Change Conference COP20 as a government delegate.

Heon Seok

Heon Seok

Stepheni Uh

Stepheni Uh

Stepheni Uh graduated from Emory University with degrees in Neuroscience and Ethics. As the 2014-15 Bobby Jones Fellow, she completed her MPhil in Behavioural and Neural Sciences at the University of St Andrews, Scotland. She has since engaged in exploratory and clinical research at the University of Pennsylvania’s Center for Neuroscience & Society and the Center for Autism Research at the CHOP. Since her time at Emory, she has also collaborated with the Dalai Lama and Emory’s Emory-Tibet Science Initiative, providing unique cross-cultural perspectives into her studies.

Her primary interests lie in the ethical, social, and legal implications of human neuroscience research as well as the translation of science for policy across diverse populations. Stepheni was recently awarded the Gates Cambridge Scholarship to pursue her PhD at the University of Cambridge’s MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit. She will investigate the neurophysiological foundations of resilience in children growing up in poverty with the hope to better inform interventions and policies targeting human development and well-being.