Delegates

Amy Adams

Amy Adams

Dr. Amy B. Adams currently serves as Director of the Office of Scientific Liaison (OSL) at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke at NIH, where she leads OSL efforts to provide a seamless flow of information on research advances and initiatives to the various stakeholders including scientific and academic communities, as well as policy-makers, patients, and the public. OSL manages the NINDS website, an important tool in broadly conveying this information. Previously, she served as the Director of the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR) Office of Science Policy and Analysis (OSPA) since 2008, where she was responsible for coordinating scientific planning efforts, policy analysis, and providing evaluating and reporting services for the NIDCR. Prior to joining NIDCR, Dr. Adams served as anAmerican Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Science and Technology Policy Fellow in the Office of the (NIH) Director, and subsequently served as Special Assistant to the NIH Director. Dr. Adams earned her Ph.D. in cell biology from the Yale University School of Medicine, where her research focused on the genetic and cellular basis for neurotransmitter control of behavior in C. elegans. She received her B.S. in biology from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Tasia Asakawa

Tasia Asakawa

Tasia Asakawa is Director of Development and Communications at IBRO, the International Brain Research Organization, based in Paris, France. She is responsible for partnership development and management; community building, coordination and promotion; and strategic communications, marketing and branding. Her professional experience in these areas spans over two decades in non-profit research, educational and funding organizations with a focus on scientific capacity building, sustainable development and informed policymaking. She has focused especially on supporting economically disadvantaged countries and increasing access to scientific knowledge and training at IBRO and TWAS, the World Academy of Sciences, in Trieste, Italy. Her work is committed to reinforcing and improving human welfare within common ethical and equitable frameworks through collaborative consensus building, the promotion of best practices and effective evidence-based decision-making.

Jan Bjaalie

Jan Bjaalie

Jan Bjaalie, M.D., Ph.D., is professor at the Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, University of Oslo, and leader of the Neuroinformatics Platform of the EU Human Brain Project. He was founding Executive Director of the International Neuroinformatics Coordinating Facility (INCF) and is currently head of the INCF Norwegian Node and member of the INCF Council for Training, Science, and Infrastructure. His research group has studied wiring patterns in the brain and developed data systems for organizing and managing heterogeneous neuroscience research data by use of a new generation of digital brain atlases. The group develops software and workflows for analysis of data integrated in the atlases (“Google maps of the brain”). Jan Bjaalie is Chief Editor of Frontiers in Neuroinformatics and Section editor of Brain Structure and Function.

James Bourne

James Bourne

James Bourne is an Associate Professor in the Australian Regenerative Medicine Institute at Monash University. He completed his undergraduate training in Biochemistry (Hons) at the Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, Londonand PhD in the field of Neuropharmacology with the Ministry of Defence and King’s College, London. He then relocated to Australia to undertake a Postdoctoral position at the Vision, Touch and Hearing Research Centre at UQ, later moving to Monash University where in 2007 he started up his own research group. James holds an NHMRC Senior Research Fellowship, is a member of the NHMRC Research Committee and has a strong track record in the field of neural development and regeneration of the visual system. He heads the Bourne group, with his skills and expertise in nonhuman primate research enabling the group to undertake cross-disciplinary research collaborations which form an important component of translational research to humans.

Matthew Bosworth

Matthew Bosworth

Matthew Bosworth is Director of Cloud and Data Engineering and the Data Protection Officer at EMOTIV, the global leader in contextualized neuroinformatics. At EMOTIV he is responsible for the privacy, security, and availability of one of the world’s largest databases of EEG data. Previously, Mr. Bosworth was Principal Research Software Engineer and a member of the HIPAA Technical Working Group at NeuroPace, where he was responsible for the world’s largest database of ambulatory ECoG recordings. His professional experience includes engineering, management, and entrepreneurship. He has participated in both GDPR and HIPAA implementations. Additionally he has significant experience in firmware development, database architecture, web engineering, and cross-cultural engineering management. He earned his MS in computer engineering at the Institute for Complex Engineered Systems at Carnegie Mellon University, and his BS in computer engineering at Tulane University. In his spare time he enjoys international travel, bicycle touring, and yoga.

Jennifer Chandler

Jennifer Chandler

Jennifer A. Chandler researches and writes about the legal and ethical aspects of biomedical science and technology, with focuses on mental health law and policy, neuroethics, organ donation and regenerative medicine.  She has published widely in legal, bioethical and health sciences journals and is the co-editor of the recent book Law and Mind:  Mental Health Law and Policy in Canada (2016). 
She is an elected member of the Board of Directors of the International Neuroethics Society, and serves on international editorial boards in the field, including Clinical Neuroethics (part of the Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics), the Springer Book Series Advances in Neuroethics, and the Palgrave-MacMillan Book Series Law, Neuroscience and Human Behavior. 
She holds the Bertram Loeb Research Chair at the University of Ottawa, leading several research teams addressing trust in the organ and tissue donation system, family decision-making at end of life, and the law and ethics of ante-mortem interventions intended to support organ donation.  She is also a co-lead of the Research Core on Ethics, Law and Society for the Canadian National Transplant Research Program.
At the University of Ottawa, Professor Chandler teaches courses in Mental Health Law and Neuroethics, Medical-Legal Issues, and Tort Law. She holds degrees in Law from Harvard University and Queen’s University, and a degree in Biology from the University of Western Ontario.  She joined the University of Ottawa’s Faculty of Law in 2002, after serving as clerk to the Hon. Mr. Justice John Sopinka of the Supreme Court of Canada. 

James Deshler

James Deshler

James Deshler is the Deputy Director of the Division of Biological Infrastructure at the National Science Foundation (NSF). Dr. Deshler received his bachelor’s degree in Microbiology and Immunology and his Ph.D. in RNA Biology from the University of California, Los Angeles. He did his postdoctoral fellowship at City of Hope, and other post-graduate work at Harvard Medical School. In 1997, he became a faculty member in Biology at Boston University, where he remained for 11 years. Among his many accomplishments, he and his laboratory designed a program called REPFIND, which they used to study localization of messenger RNAs. In his role at the NSF, he works with scientific communities and the Office of Science Technology and Policy to develop strategies of scientific investments, in order to maintain the role of the U.S. as a leader in cutting- edge biological sciences.

James Eberwine

James Eberwine

Dr. Eberwine is the Elmer Holmes Bobst Professor of Systems Pharmacology and Translational Therapeutics at the University of Pennsylvania where he also serves as Co-Director of the PENN Program in Single Cell Biology. He also is Adjunct Professor of Molecular Medicine at The Scripps Research Institute. Dr. Eberwine developed single cell PCR, the aRNA amplification protocol, TIVA in vivo analysis and coined the phrase “expression profile” to describe the relative abundances of RNAs. Dr. Eberwine’s work has highlighted the kinetics of translation in neuronal dendrites, pioneered the concept of cytoplasmic RNA splicing and illuminated the role of RNA populations in establishing and maintaining cellular phenotype. Dr. Eberwine is an inventor on over 170 patent applications and was elected to the National Academy of Inventors in 2014. Dr. Eberwine has organized several international meetings and symposia under the auspices of a variety of entities including the European Molecular Biology Organization and Cold Spring Harbor Labs. Dr. Eberwine has served as a member of the Board of Scientific Counselors for NIDA, is a member of the external Advisory Board for the Institute of Genome Biology of the University Illinois and is a member of the Scientific Advisory Board for the EP Abraham Trust Fund of Sir William Dunn School of Pathology, Oxford University. Dr. Eberwine is on Council for the National Institute for Alcoholism and Alcohol Abuse and a member of the newly formed Multi Council Working Group at NIH, which consults on the Brain Initiative. Dr. Eberwine originated and directed the Cold Spring Harbor Summer Course formerly entitled “Cloning of Neural Genes” and now called “Advanced Techniques in Neuroscience”. Dr. Eberwine has directed or taught in this course 21 times over its’ 31 year history. In 2012, he developed and Co-Directed the first single cell course at Cold Spring Harbor entitled “Single Cell Techniques”.Dr. Eberwine also co-developed the Neuroscience School of Advanced Study Course on Single Cell Analysis. Dr. Eberwine has given many honorary/plenary talks and received various awards including two NARSAD Distinguished Investigator Awards, a MERIT award from NIH, the NIH Pioneer Award, an Ellison Foundation Senior Scholar Award, the McKnight Technological Innovations in Neuroscience Award and the Brain Research Foundation Science Innovation Award.

Michele Farisco

Michele Farisco

Michele Farisco is part of CRB’s neuroethics research team. He was recently appointed Associate Professor of Moral Philosophy in Italy. He holds a degree in Philosophy from University of Naples “L’Orientale” in 2003, a PhD in “Ethics and Anthropology. History and Foundation” from University of Lecce in 2008 and a Master degree in Biolaw from the University of Rome “Lumsa” in 2009. He spent time on an exchange grant from the European Neuroscience and Society Network within the European Science Foundation joining the Coma Science Group of the University of Liège (Belgium). He is the head of the “Science and society” research unit of Biogem Genetic Research Centre in Ariano Irpino (Italy). He is the author of three books and several articles about posthuman philosophy and philosophical, ethical and legal implications (ELSI) of genetics and neuroscience. Michele Farisco is currently working on his second PhD about the neuroscience of disorders of consciousness (from laboratory to clinics). He will study the ethical and legal issues emerging from neuroscientific investigation of Disorders of Consciousness and related technological applications. The project is a part of the European Union flagship Human Brain Project.

Lesley Fellows

Lesley Fellows

Dr. Lesley Fellows is a neurologist specializing in disorders of cognition. She has a particular interest in the functions of the frontal lobes. Her research program focuses on the brain basis of decision making in humans, using the tools of cognitive neuroscience. She studies how focal brain damage or neurochemical dysfunction affects all aspects of decision making, how options are generated and organized, how they are valued and compared, and how choices are made. She is also interested in more general questions about the roles of the frontal lobes in the regulation of emotion, the expression of personality traits, and the representation of past and future information. This work has relevance for understanding impaired executive function following frontal lobe injury from aneurysm rupture, stroke, or tumour growth, as well as in degenerative conditions such as Parkinson’s Disease and some forms of dementia. It also provides insights into how the component processes that underly decision making are carried out in the intact brain.

Alvaro Fernandez

Alvaro Fernandez

Alvaro Fernandez, named a Young Global Leader, runs SharpBrains, an independent market research firm tracking applied neuroscience. A recognized public speaker, he has been quoted by The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, CNN, Reuters, and Associated Press, among others. Alvaro is the Editor-in-chief of seminal market reports on Pervasive Neurotechnology and Digital Brain Health, and co-author of the book The SharpBrains Guide to Brain Fitness. He enjoys serving in the World Economic Forum’s Council on the Future of Human Enhancement, and in the Global Teacher Prize Academy run by the Varkey Foundation. Alvaro holds an MBA and MA in Education from Stanford University and a BA in Economics from Universidad de Deusto, in his native Spain.

Tyr Fothergill

Tyr Fothergill

Dr. Tyr Fothergill is a Research Fellow in Ethics Support and Researcher Awareness on the Human Brain Project in the Centre for Computing and Social Responsibility, Faculty of Technology at De Montfort University. Tyr originally trained as a palaeopathologist studying signs of disease and injury in skeletal remains from archaeological sites, but her interest in the processes and nature of research and innovation led to a shift in personal research focus. Tyr is interested in data ethics, technology ethics and neuroethics; ethics communication and outreach; responsible data governance; archaeological insights into human-nonhuman relationships in digital environments; neuroscience history; and developing a temporally-contingent framework for researcher reflection within Responsible Research and Innovation. Tyr is also an Auroran (Women in Leadership in HE) with interests in intersectionality, representation, and equality issues.

Hermann Garden

Hermann Garden

My research and health policy interests are the development of innovative therapies and diagnostics for unmet medical needs and cross-sectoral collaboration. I trained in Biology and Pharmacy at the University of Düsseldorf, Germany: PhD in Biology (2003); graduation in Pharmacy (2004). I worked several years as the Deputy Head of the Pharmaceutical Medicines Unit at the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, Basel. My passion for health system strengthening and product development partnerships stems from frequent work assignments in Sub-Saharan Africa. Subsequently I moved to the World Health Organization (WHO) where I coordinated the Better Medicines for Children project and the Paediatric medicines Regulators Network (PmRN). In 2011 I joined Novartis Vaccines and Diagnostics (Siena, Italy) as a Senior Clinical Research Scientist where I led clinical development programmes in pandemic and paediatric vaccines. In my current position as a Health Policy Analyst at the OECD (Science and Technology Policy Division) I support the Working Party on Biotechnology, Nanotechnology and Converging Technologies (BNCT); foci of my work are: the development and use of novel technologies in biomedical research and clinical application; advancing regulatory science; and, ethical, legal and social implications of emerging technologies.

Hank Greely

Hank Greely

Henry T. “Hank” Greely is the Deane F. and Kate Edelman Johnson Professor of Law and Professor, by courtesy, of Genetics at Stanford University. He specializes in ethical, legal, and social issues arising from advances in the biosciences, particularly from genetics, neuroscience, and human stem cell research. He chairs the California Advisory Committee on Human Stem Cell Research and the steering committee of the Stanford University Center for Biomedical Ethics, and directs the Stanford Center for Law and the Biosciences and the Stanford Program in Neuroscience and Society. He serves as a member of the NAS Committee on Science, Technology, and Law; the NIGMS Advisory Council, the Institute of Medicine’s Neuroscience Forum, and the NIH Multi-Center Working Group on the BRAIN Initiative. Professor Greely graduated from Stanford in 1974 and from Yale Law School in 1977. He served as a law clerk for Judge John Minor Wisdom on the United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit and for Justice Potter Stewart of the United States Supreme Court. He began teaching at Stanford in 1985.

Manuel Guerrero

Manuel Guerrero

Manuel Guerrero is a sociologist and bioethicist with extensive experience in human rights. He holds a Postgraduate Diploma in Medical Ethics and Research Ethics, and a PhD in Sociology. He is Assistant Professor in bioethics at the Department of Bioethics and Medical Humanities in the Faculty of Medicine and of ethics at the Center for the Study of Applied Ethics in the Faculty of Philosophy and Humanities at the University of Chile. He currently works as Research Coordinator at the Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, in the Division of Neurogeriatrics at the Karolinska Institutet, and is Visiting Researcher in Philosophy of the Brain and Neuroethics at the Centre for Research Ethics and Bioethics, at Uppsala University. He is part of the Human Brain Project (HBP), where he is task leader for the Ethics Rapporteur Programme and collaborates, as a Postdoctoral researcher, with the Neuroethics and Philosophy work team. His research interests combine philosophy, social sciences and neuroethics, with focus on the ethical and social implications of brain research and neurotechnologies.

L. Syd M Johnson

L. Syd M Johnson

L. Syd M Johnson, PhD is an Associate Professor of Philosophy & Bioethics in the Departments of Humanities, and Kinesiology & Integrative Physiology at Michigan Technological University. She received her PhD in Philosophy at University at Albany, State University of New York. Her current research focuses on ethical and epistemic issues related to brain injuries, with an emphasis on sport-related concussion, disorders of consciousness, and brain death.

Bang-Ook Jun

Bang-Ook Jun

Bang-Ook Jun has been a Professor of Biology at Gangneung-Wonju National University since 1986. He received his Ph.D. in Seoul National University, Department of Botany in 1986. He completed his postdoctoral training at the University of Florida, Department of Botany. He was a Visiting Professor of University of Calgary, Faculty of Communication and Culture and is now a Visiting Professor of American University of Sovereign Nations, Arizona. He was the President of Gangneung-Wonju National University in 2012-2015. He was the President of Korean Bioethics Association in 2008-2009. He has contributed to the Asian Bioethics Association as Vice-President for Korea in 2010-2014 and as President since 2016. He has written articles including “Ethical Issues on the Human Embryonic Genome Editing” and “The Ethics of Therapeutic Gene Editing Research.” His main research focus is on the ethics of emerging biotechnologies.

Walter Koroshetz

Walter Koroshetz

Walter J. Koroshetz, M.D., was selected Director of NINDS on June 11, 2015. Dr. Koroshetz joined NINDS in 2007 as Deputy Director, and he served as Acting Director from October 2014 through June 2015. As NINDS Director, Dr. Koroshetz directs program planning and budgeting, and oversees the scientific and administrative functions of the Institute. He has held leadership roles in many NIH and NINDS programs including the NIH’s Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies (BRAIN) Initiative, the NIH Blueprint for Neuroscience Research, the Traumatic Brain Injury Center collaborative effort between the NIH intramural program and the Uniformed Health Services University, and the establishment of the NIH Office of Emergency Care Research. Additionally, Dr. Koroshetz serves as Chair of the Interagency Pain Research Coordinating Committee (IPRCC) and the Executive Committee for the NIH Pain Consortium.Before joining NINDS, Dr. Koroshetz served as Vice Chair of the neurology service and Director of stroke and neurointensive care services at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). He was a professor of neurology at Harvard Medical School (HMS) and led neurology resident training at MGH between 1990 and 2007. Over that same period, he co-directed the HMS Neurobiology of Disease course with Drs. Edward Kravitz and Robert H. Brown. A native of Brooklyn, New York, Dr. Koroshetz graduated from Georgetown University and received his medical degree from the University of Chicago. He trained in internal medicine at the University of Chicago and Massachusetts General Hospital. Dr. Koroshetz trained in neurology at MGH, after which he did post-doctoral studies in cellular neurophysiology at MGH with Dr. David Corey, and later at the Harvard neurobiology department with Dr. Edward Furshpan, studying mechanisms of excitoxicity and neuroprotection. He joined the neurology staff, first in the Huntington’s Disease (HD) unit, followed by the stroke and neurointensive care service. A major focus of his clinical research career was to develop measures in patients that reflect the underlying biology of their conditions. With the MGH team he discovered increased brain lactate in HD patients using MR spectroscopy. He helped the team to pioneer the use of diffusion/perfusion-weighted MR imaging and CT angiography/perfusion imaging in acute stroke.

Neil Levy

Neil Levy

Dr. Neil Levy received his PhD in Continental Philosophy in 1995 and a second PhD, this time in analytic philosophy, in 2006. He was a Research Fellow at the Centre for Applied Philosophy and Public Ethics, University of Melbourne, from 2002 to 2009. In 2010 he moved to the Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, where he was Head of Neuroethics and an ARC Future Fellow. From 2006 onwards, he has held appointments at the University of Oxford, where he is currently Leverhulme Visiting Professor. From 2016, he will be half time at Oxford and half time at Macquarie. Neil’s current research is focused on a number of questions concerning how the cognitive sciences can illuminate traditional philosophical debates. He is especially interested in the extent to which ascriptions of moral responsibility continue to be justified in the light of findings in neuroscience and social psychology on action control, and in how nonconscious representations affect action. He also works on free will and moral responsibility more broadly, on applied ethics and the philosophy of psychology.

Inyoung Lee

Inyoung Lee

Inyoung Lee is a Professor at Hongik University, College of Law. She received B.A, M.A, and Ph.D. degrees in Criminal Law in 1983, 1986 and 1994 at Yonsei University. She was a member of the Korean National Bioethics Committee and the former president of the Korean Bioethics Society. She is a Chief of Editorial Board of Korea National Institute for Bioethics Policy. She is one of the organizers of the Korean Neuroethics Study Group established in 2017. She has broad interest in the ethical, legal and social implications of neuroscience. This includes the impact of neuroscientific research on human, neurogenetics, brain injury, adolescence brain science, and neurological evidence.

Ana Maiques

Ana Maiques

Ana Maiques is the CEO of Neuroelectrics, a company aiming to change the way we interact with the brain; developing innovative technologies to monitor and stimulate the brain. She was nominated by IESE as one of the most influential entrepreneurs under 40 in Spain in 2010, she was the only woman on that list. She received the EU Prize for Women Innovators from the European Commission EC in 2014. Also in 2014, she was an award recipient of the International Women’s Entrepreneurial Challenge. In 2015 & 2016, she was named one of most inspiring women on the Inspiring Fifty list in Europe of women technological leaders and innovators. As a company, Neuroelectrics received the Best Start-up in Health Award in 2015 by Wired UK magazine and in 2016 was recognized as one of the “Best Entrepreneurial Companies in America” by Entrepreneur Magazine’s Entrepreneur 360™ List, the most comprehensive analysis of private companies in America. Ana continues to break the barriers for women and entrepreneurs bringing together science and technology in an impactful way.

Christopher Martin

Christopher Martin

Chris Martin is the Interim Vice President for Science Programs at The Kavli Foundation, where he has been a Science Program Officer since 2013. He leads the Foundation’s interactions with its 20 endowed Kavli Institutes around the world in the fields of Theoretical Physics, Astrophysics, Nanoscience, and Neuroscience and builds catalytic opportunities to advance scientific research and funding, such as the U.S. BRAIN Initiative.

Dr. Martin’s interests span the continuum from physics to public policy. Prior to joining the Foundation, he was a professor of physics and astronomy at Oberlin College (2004-2013) where he studied the Milky Way Galaxy using the Herschel Space Observatory, long duration balloon missions, and telescopes around the world. During his tenure at Oberlin, he spent a year as an American Association for the Advancement of Science Congressional Fellow with the United States Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation and was involved in the America COMPETES Reauthorization Act of 2010, space policy, nanotechnology, and the federal funding of science research. Dr. Martin completed his Ph.D. in theoretical physics at the University of California Santa Barbara in 1999, and then became the Station Science Leader at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station and spent two years wintering over at the bottom of the Earth during his postdoctoral fellowship at the Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics.

Hannah Maslen

Hannah Maslen

Hannah Maslen is the Deputy Director of theOxford Uehiro Centre for Practical Ethics. Hannah is a Research Fellow at New College and at the Oxford Martin School. She works on a wide range of topics in applied philosophy and ethics; from neuroethics, to moral emotions and criminal justice. She is a Principal Investigator on the Horizon 2020 BrainCom project, which aims to advance the basic understanding of speech networks in the cerebral cortex, and to develop rehabilitation solutions using innovative brain-computer interfaces.She leads the work package on ‘Ethics, Implants and Society’. You can find more information about her on her website (https://hannahmaslen.wordpress.com).

Agnes McMahon

Agnes McMahon

Agnes McMahon joined The Kavli Foundation in August 2018 as the inaugural Science Program Fellow. Prior to her work at the Foundation, she served as the Program Manager for the ENIGMA Consortium, an international collaboration in neuroimaging and genomics. Agnes began her career with a B.S. from the University of North Carolina and a post-baccalaureate fellowship in functional neuroimaging at the Duke-UNC Brain Imaging and Analysis Center. She then earned her M.S. in Clinical Science from the University of Colorado, culminating in a thesis on adolescent brain structure in substance use disorder. After graduate school, Agnes joined the Cognitive Neurology division at Johns Hopkins University to research non-verbal autism spectrum disorder. In Agnes’s current role with The Kavli Foundation, she provides coordination and support for the International Brain Initiative. She also contributes to the Foundation’s broader neuroscience efforts, including activities for the US BRAIN Initiative.

Kentaro Morita

Kentaro Morita

Kentaro Morita is a psychiatrist and researcher at the University of Tokyo in Tokyo, Japan. He obtained his medical degree in 2010 at Nippon Medical School and has completed his medical training at the University of Tokyo Hospital. He currently practices in adolescence and adult psychiatry giving care in both Japanese and English. Dr. Morita is also a researcher in the field of psychiatry with primary interest in mental illnesses such as Schizophrenia. His research is mainly based on neurobiological aspects of mental illness, such as neurophysiology and neuroimaging, with a future goal of applying these methods to early detection/intervention and rehabilitation. He is currently finishing his Ph.D., which is focused on eye movement abnormalities in schizophrenia and their significance in everyday life. He has been conducting this research under the supervision of Ryota Hashimoto at the National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, Kenichiro Miura at the University of Kyoto, and Kiyoto Kasai at the University of Tokyo within the Brain/MINDS project. Dr. Morita is a member of the Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology, the Japanese Society of Biological Psychiatry, the Japanese Society of General Hospital Psychiatry, the Japanese Society of Schizophrenia Research, the Japanese Neuroscience Society, and an International Member of the American Psychiatric Association.

Eisuke Nakazawa

Eisuke Nakazawa

Eisuke Nakazawa, PhD, is a lecturer in the Department of Biomedical Ethics at the University of Tokyo Graduate School of Medicine (Japan). His research interests lie in neuroethics, research ethics and philosophy of science. His recent book publication is Ethics of Decoded Neurofeedback in Clinical Research, Treatment, and Moral Enhancement (Nakazawa E et al. 2016). American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 7(2): 110–117.

Shigeo Okabe

Shigeo Okabe

Shigeo Okabe is a professor of Cellular Neurobiology in the Graduate School of Medicine at the University of Tokyo. Shigeo is also the director of the Brain Medical Science Collaboration Division at RIKEN Centre for Brain Science. Shigeo obtained his M.D. at the University of Tokyo School of Medicine in 1986 and Ph.D. in the Division of Medical Science at The Graduate School of the University of Tokyo in 1993. His research interests include neuron and glia biology, synapse development and remodeling, postsynaptic density, synapse plasticity, neuronal cytoskeleton and neurodevelopment disorders.

Hideyuki Okano

Hideyuki Okano

Hideyuki Okano received his M.D. in 1983 and Ph.D. in 1988 from Keio University. He held a post-doctoral position at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. He was appointed full professors at Tsukuba University School of Medicine in 1994, Osaka University School of Medicine in 1997, and returned to Keio University Medical School in 2001 as a full professor of Physiology. Since 2007, he has been the Dean of Keio University Graduate School of Medicine, or Keio University School of Medicine. In 2009, his group developed a transgenic technology of common marmoset (Sasaki et al., Nature, 2009). He has been a Project Leader of Japan Brain/MINDS since 2014.

Tony Prescott

Tony Prescott

I am a Professor of Cognitive Robotics at the University of Sheffield and Director of Sheffield Roboticsan interdisciplinary research institute across both Universities in Sheffield. I am a researcher, educator, and technology developer working in the fields of synthetic psychology, computational neuroscience, and bio-inspired robotics. A particular focus is on the investigation of biomimetic and biohybrid systems: an example of the former would be an animal-like or humanoid robot, of the latter, a human-machine interface. My current research is directed towards (i) social cognition for humanoid robots (three EU projects in this area); (ii) active touch sensing for attention and orienting; (iii) assistive and field robotic technologies; (iv) haptic interfaces for sensory augmentation; and (v) societal and ethical issues in technology.

Linda Richards

Linda Richards

Linda J. Richards, PhD, FAA, FAHMS is a Professor of Neuroscience and Deputy Director of the Queensland Brain Institute at The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia. She is a Fellow of both the Australian Academy of Science and the Australian Academy of Health and Medical Sciences and is a National Health and Medical Research Council Principal Research Fellow. She is President of the Australasian Neuroscience Society and co-chair of the Australian Brain Alliance. Professor Richards is head of the brain development and disorders laboratory at QBI. Her laboratory team strives to understand how the brain forms during development and how these processes are disrupted causing human developmental brain disorders and brain cancer. Professor Richards is a leading expert on the formation of the corpus callosum and is scientific advisor and patron for AusDoCC. In 2015 she co-founded an International Consortium for the Corpus Callosum and Cerebral Connectivity with colleagues from Australia, USA, France and Brazil. The consortium brings together clinicians and scientists working to identify the causes of developmental brain disorders and how best to provide support and care for affected individuals and their families. Professor Richards has received a number of awards and fellowships throughout her career including the Charles Judson Herrick Award from the American Association of Anatomists in 2004 and the Nina Kondelos award from the Australasian Neuroscience Society in 2010. Professor Richards is passionate about the public awareness of science and in 2006 she founded the Australian Brain Bee Challenge, a competition for high school students to learn about the brain. Over 30,000 high school students have participated in the challenge and students from Australia have won the international brain bee competition three times and placed in every event since 2006.

Eric Racine

Eric Racine

Dr. Eric Racine is a leading international researcher in bioethics with recognized contributions to the development of neuroethics and pragmatic ethics. He is the author of Pragmatic Neuroethics: Improving Treatment and Understanding of the Mind-Brain, published by MIT Press. Inspired by philosophical pragmatism, his research aims to bring to the forefront the lived experience of ethically problematic situations by patients and stakeholders and then to resolve them collaboratively through deliberative and evidence-informed processes. You can find more information about him at http://www.pragmatichealthethics.ca/member/eric-racine-2/.

Julie Robillard

Julie Robillard

Julie Robillard is a recently appointed Assistant Professor of Neurology that leads a research program at the intersection of dementia, ethics, and technology. Her current research is aimed at evaluating the quality and ethics of online health information and computerized tools for dementia screening and diagnosis. Dr. Robillard holds a B.Sc. in Biology from the Université de Montréal and became interested in a career in research while working as an undergraduate research assistant in a neuropharmacology lab where she learned to record electrical signals from brain cells. She then moved to Vancouver to complete her PhD in neuroscience at UBC, focusing on the mechanisms underlying synaptic plasticity, a model for learning and memory, in the aging brain. During her PhD, Dr. Robillard became interested in how findings from neuroscience laboratories impact the lives of individuals and societies. To investigate this further, she joined the National Core for Neuroethics at UBC for postdoctoral training where she built on her thesis work in a way that emphasizes the human translational side of neuroscience. Now an Assistant Professor at UBC, Dr. Robillard’s goals are to ensure that older adults have access to high quality online information to support their health decision-making, and to ensure that new technological innovations for the screening, diagnosis, and treatment of dementia are aligned with social values and meet the highest ethical standards to maximize the benefit and minimize the harms to our older demographic. Dr. Robillard’s position in the UBC Division of Neurology at the UBC Department of Medicine has provided her with the opportunity to engage with various stakeholders in health care, including physicians, other researchers, residents, students, and members of the public. She feels that the UBC Department of Medicine, the National Core for Neuroethics, and Djavad Mowafaghian Centre for Brain Health, all together, provide a rich and productive research environment, ideal for her research. She has co-chaired the 2014 Brain Matters! Vancouver International conference, organized outreach programs showcasing the research done by students in the UBC Neuroscience graduate program, and has been to invited to present her work at prestigious conferences around the world. This summer, she will present her work on online self-assessments for dementia at the 2015 Alzheimer Congress in London, UK and at the Alzheimer Association International Conference in Washington, DC. Aside from research, she enjoys mountain biking and sailing.

Young Joon Ryu

Young Joon Ryu

Young-Joon is a professor in the Department of Pathology at the Kangwon National University Hospital and College of Medicine, and is the lead professor in the Department of Medical Humanities and Medical Ethics at Kangwon National University College of Medicine. He is a member of many professional organizations, including the National Bioethics Council, Korean Bioethics Association, Korean Society for Medical Ethics, and Neuroethics Study Group. Young-Joon received his Ph.D. in Medicine (Medical History and Ethics) at Seoul National University in 2011 and M.D. from Kosin University in 1998. He completed his residentship training in the Department of Pathology at Korea University Hospital and served as a clinical fellow at the Asan Medical Center from 2011-2013.

Jeong-Woo Sohn

Jeong-Woo Sohn

Dr. Jeong-woo Sohn is a professor in the department of medical science at Catholic Kwandong University International St. Mary’s Hospital in the Republic of Korea. He obtained his bachelor degree in nuclear engineering, master degree in cognitive science from Seoul Nation University in Korea and a Ph.D. degree in Brain and Cognitive Sciences from University of Rochester, NY, USA. Then he had been trained as a post-doctoral researcher in University of Pittsburgh, PA, USA. He returned to Korea and became a principal researcher at Medical Device Development Center of Daegu-Gyeonbuk Medical Innovation Foundation. He led a research group of medical imaging investigation during this time. His research interests are in brain and machine interface, motor learning and statistical analysis on neural data.

Sunhae Sul

Sunhae Sul

Sunhae is an Assistant Professor of Psychology and the director of Social Neuroscience Lab at Pusan National University. She graduated from Seoul National University with a M.A. in biological psychology and a Ph.D. in social psychology in 2010. Upon completing her post-doctoral training in neuroeconomics at the University of Zurich in Switzerland, she worked as a research professor and a post-doctoral researcher at Korea University and at Dartmouth College. Sunhae’s research centers around psychological and neural mechanisms underlying social decision making and moral judgment and the effect of prosocial (and anti-social) behaviors on well-being at both individual and societal levels. She is also interested in individual differences and cultural influences.

Guoyu Wang

Guoyu Wang

Dr. Guoyu Wang studied at Fudan University, Free University of Berlin (Freie Universitat Berlin), University of Stuttgart (Universitat Stuttgart) and Dalian University of Technology. She is now a professor of ethics in the School of Philosophy at Fudan University, and serves as the Director of the Applied Ethics Research Center and Biomedical Ethics Research Center, Fudan University. Professor Wang has also assumed many other academic duties, including serving as vice-president of the Society for Science, Technology and Engineering Ethics, engaging in executive council of The Society of Technology Philosophy, Bioethics, Environmental Ethics and Chinese Society of Nanotoxicology. Professor Wang is mainly interested in the research field of Scientific and Technological Ethics. She is Chief Scientist of the Major Program of the National Social Science Fund of China, research on ethical, political, and regulatory framework of precision medicine. She has published several books and more than 60 papers in domestic and foreign journals.

Yi Wang

Yi Wang

I graduated from Beijing Normal University with a BS in biology in 2010. After college, I went to University of Nebraska Medical Center (UNMC) for graduate study in pharmacology and experimental neuroscience. I was awarded with a PhD degree in neuroscience in 2015. After that, I worked as a research associate in the Laboratory of Neuroimmunology and Regenerative Therapy, UNMC. At the same time, I studied biostatistics and epidemiology as a part-time student in the College of Public Health, UNMC and was awarded a master of public health degree in biostatistics in 2016. Now I am working as an assistant professor/researcher in Tongji Univeristy School of Medicine. My interests lie in studies on ethical standards of neuroscience projects in China and worldwide, and the neuroscience of ethics under the background of Chinese history.

Paul Root Wolpe

Paul Root Wolpe

Paul Root Wolpe, Ph.D. is the Asa Griggs Candler Professor of Bioethics, the Raymond F. Schinazi Distinguished Research Chair in Jewish Bioethics, a Professor in the Departments of Medicine, Pediatrics, Psychiatry, and Sociology, and the Director of the Center for Ethics at Emory University.  Dr. Wolpe also serves as the first Senior Bioethicist for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), where he is responsible for formulating policy on bioethical issues and safeguarding research subjects. He is Co-Editor of the American Journal of Bioethics (AJOB), the premier scholarly journal in bioethics, and Editor of AJOB Neuroscience, and sits on the editorial boards of over a dozen professional journals in medicine and ethics. Dr Wolpe is a past President of the American Society for Bioethics and Humanities; a Fellow of the College of Physicians of Philadelphia, the country’s oldest medical society; a Fellow of the Hastings Center, the oldest bioethics institute in America; and was the first National Bioethics Advisor to Planned Parenthood Federation of America.
Dr. Wolpe moved to Emory University in the summer of 2008 from the University of Pennsylvania, where he was on the faculty for over 20 years in the Departments of Psychiatry, Sociology, and Medical Ethics.  He was a Senior Fellow of Penn’s Center for Bioethics, and directed the Scattergood Program for the Applied Ethics of Behavioral Health and the Program in Psychiatry and Ethics at the School of Medicine.
Dr. Wolpe is the author of over 125 articles, editorials, and book chapters in sociology, medicine, and bioethics, and has contributed to a variety of encyclopedias on bioethical issues.  A futurist interested in social dynamics, Dr. Wolpe’s work focuses on the social, religious, ethical, and ideological impact of technology on the human condition.  Considered one of the founders of the field of neuroethics, which examines the ethical implications of neuroscience, he also writes about other emerging technologies, such as genetic engineering, nanotechnology, prosthetics, and new reproductive technologies. 

Jie Yin

Jie Yin

Dr. Jie Yin is currently an associate professor at School of Philosophy, Fudan University. She is an interdisciplinary researcher working on bioethics, philosophy of medicine and Kant. She was trained in both medical school (Fudan University) and philosophy department (Fudan University, SUNY Albany). After graduating from SUNY Albany with her PhD in philosophy, she worked as a faculty in both department of philosophy and department of medical humanities at Southeast University (Nanjing, China), where she taught philosophy majors as well as medical students. She has won several teaching awards and was the principal investigator of a few research projects on bioethics, including a national-level grant on just health. Dr. Yin was awarded scholarship for attending international bioethics symposium by Kennedy Institute of Ethics (Georgetown University), and was invited by several research universities to give talks on bioethics, including Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Baptist University, etc. She was the vice chair and associate professor at the department of philosophy (Southeast University) before she accepted the job offer at Fudan University. Dr. Yin has published articles and a book in Chinese on the themes of bioethics, analytic philosophy and Kant, and she also regularly teaches philosophy of nursing for nursing PhD students at eight top medical universities in China. She worked at two think tanks for Jiangsu Provincial Government and is now serving as consultant in several national-level interdisciplinary research projects regarding, broadly construed, science and technology related ethical issues. Dr. Yin is now working on a paper on philosophy of psychiatry while teaching a grad course on neuroethics and an undergrad course on Kant’s moral philosophy.

Mariela Zirlinger

Mariela Zirlinger

Mariela Zirlinger has been an editor with Cell Press since 2011, first as a scientific editor and since 2017 as the Editor in Chief of Neuron. Neuron publishes interdisciplinary work in neuroscience, from molecular, to systems-level, including cognitive and theoretical domains. The journal commissions reviews and commentaries to highlight themes, synthesize insights and also serves as a platform to promote discussions at the interface of science and society. Mariela oversees the review process and the Neuron editorial team, and handles manuscript submissions across all areas of neuroscience. Her scientific training is in mouse genetics, behavior, and molecular and developmental neurobiology. Before joining Neuron, Mariela was a postdoc at Harvard. She completed her Ph.D. in Neurobiology at Caltech, after studying Chemistry at the University of Buenos Aires, Argentina.