Advisory Board

Arisa Ema

Arisa Ema

Arisa Ema is the Assistant Professor at the University of Tokyo and Visiting Researcher at RIKEN Center for Advanced Intelligence Project in Japan. She is a researcher in Science and Technology Studies (STS), and her primary interest is to investigate the benefits and risks of artificial intelligence by organizing an interdisciplinary research group. She is a co-founder of the Acceptable Intelligence with Responsibility Study Group (AIR), established in 2014, which seeks to address emerging issues and relationships between artificial intelligence and society. She is a member of the Ethics Committee of the Japanese Society for Artificial Intelligence (JSAI), which released the Japanese Society for Artificial Intelligence Society Ethical Guidelines in 2017. She is also one of the organizers of the 2017 “IEEE Ethically Aligned Design, Version 1 Workshop in Japan.” She obtained her Ph.D. from the University of Tokyo in 2012 and previously held a position as Assistant Professor at the Hakubi Center for Advanced Research, Kyoto University.

Sung-Jin Jeong

Sung-Jin Jeong

Co-chair

Sung-Jin Jeong is a principal Researcher at the Korea Brain Research Institute. She received her Ph.D. in Molecular Biology from Seoul National University, and then worked as a Research Fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital for seven years. She then worked as a Research Fellow and Staff Scientist at Children’s Hospital Boston, before joining the Korea Brain Research Institute in 2013. Dr. Jeong recently published an article in Neuron, describing the history and goals of the Korean Brain Initiative. This initiative is centered on deciphering the brain functions and mechanisms that underlie decision-making, and the major goal is to map a functional connectome of the brain. The project also encourages the development of novel techniques and technologies, and should ultimately have socioeconomic ramifications that facilitate global collaboration across the world.

Kiyoto Kasai

Kiyoto Kasai

Kiyoto Kasai received his M.D. from The University of Tokyo (1995) and his Ph.D. in psychiatry from The University of Tokyo (2004). After a clinical residency in psychiatry at The University of Tokyo Hospital and National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, he was appointed as Instructor at the Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo in 1999. Then he did his postdoctoral research training at the Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School (2000-2002). After coming back to Japan, he was appointed as Lecturer at the Department of Neuropsychiatry, The University of Tokyo in 2003, and he was promoted to Professor and Chair in 2008. His research focuses on understanding the pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders using multi-modality neuroimaging techniques including MRI, EEG, MEG, and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). He has published more than 260 international peer-reviewed papers. He has served as an Editorial Board Member for Lancet Psychiatry and npj Schizophrenia. He has also served as the Clinical Research Group Leader, Brain/MINDS.

Khara Ramos

Khara Ramos

Dr. Khara Ramos is a Senior Science Policy Analyst in the Office of Scientific Liaison within the Office of the Director of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, a part of the National Institutes of Health. She is leading efforts to integrate neuroethics into the NIH BRAIN Initiative. A neuroscientist and former AAAS Science and Technology Policy Fellow, she has broad interest in neuroscience research, with specific focus on how advances in neuroscience intersect with society.

Karen Rommelfanger

Karen Rommelfanger

Co-chair

Dr. Karen S. Rommelfanger received her PhD in neuroscience and postdoctoral training in neuroscience and neuroethics. Her research explores how evolving neuroscience and neurotechnologies challenge societal definitions of disease and medicine. Dr. Rommelfanger is an Assistant Professor in the Departments of Neurology and Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, the Neuroethics Program Director at Emory University’s Center for Ethics, and Senior Associate Editor at the American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience. In recognition of her leadership in the neuroethics community, Dr. Rommelfanger was appointed to the NIH BRAIN Initiative’s Neuroethics Division and acts as the Division ambassador to the Human Brain Project Ethics Advisory Board. She is dedicated to cross-cultural work in neuroethics and also serves as ethicist to the China-India Mental Health Alliance.  A key part of her work is fostering communication across multiple stakeholders in neuroscience. As such she edits the largest international online neuroethics discussion forum The Neuroethics Blog and she is a frequent contributor and commentator in popular media such as The New York Times, USA Today and The Huffington Post.

 

More detailed bio can be found here: http://karenrommelfanger.com/

Arleen Salles

Arleen Salles

Arleen Salles is the  Director of the Neuroethics Program at CIF (Centro de Investigaciones Filosoficas) in Buenos Aires, Argentina and a Senior Researcher in the Centre for Research Ethics and Bioethics, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.  She is also a task leader and research collaborator in the Ethics and Society subproject (SP12) of the EU-flagship Human Brain Project. Salles received her M.A and Ph.D in philosophy from SUNY Buffalo, USA. Her research interests include the impact of neuroscientific research on human and personal identity, ethical issues raised by simulation and consciousness, the nature and methodology of neuroethics, and the impact of cultural context on the development of the field.

For more information: http://www.crb.uu.se/staff/arleen-salles/

Ilina Singh

Ilina Singh

Ilina Singh is Professor of Neuroscience & Society at the University of Oxford, where she holds a joint appointment between the Department of Psychiatry and the Faculty of Philosophy (Oxford Centre for Neuroethics and Oxford Uehiro Centre for Practical Ethics). Her work examines the psychosocial and ethical implications of advances in biomedicine and neuroscience for young people and families. Recent projects include the ADHD VOICES project (www.adhdvoices.com); Neuroenhancement Responsible Research and Innovation (www.nerri.eu); and the Urban Brain Project (www.urbanbrainlab.com). In 2014, Professor Singh received a Wellcome Trust Senior Investigator Award for a study entitled: Becoming Good: Early Intervention and Moral Development in Child Psychiatry.

Professor Singh has published widely in eminent journals, including Nature, Nature Reviews Neuroscience, Social Science and Medicine, and the American Journal of Bioethics. She is the lead editor of a new volume: BioPrediction, Biomarkers and Bad Behavior: Scientific, Ethical and Legal Challenges (co-edited with Walter-Sinnott Armstrong and Julian Savulescu), published by Oxford University Press. She has acted as an advisor to the Nuffield Council on Bioethics, NICE, NIMH and other organisations. She is co-editor of the journal BioSocieties and on the editorial board of the American Journal of Bioethics-Neuroscience and Qualitative Psychology.